Monday, July 11, 2005

Partisan

Partisan, n. An adherent without sense.

2005 Update: adj. In the evolutionary stage between a Dinosaur and a fossil.

34 comments:

Tom & Icy said...

falling off the fence

Sar said...

Open wound causing national division, further infected by this administration's stubborn bullish tactics.

Doug said...

Icy, or leaping

Sar, good example.

a4g said...

Partisan. n. The candidate of the opposition party.

Doug said...

a4g, or the pundit. I think you've come home.

weirsdo said...

"I always voted at my part's call,
And I never thought of thinking for myself at all."
Sir Joseph Porter, K. C. B., H. M. S. Pinafore
(lyric by W. S. Gilbert)

weirsdo said...

I mean "party's call."

actonbell said...

I like weirsdo's quote:)

Doug said...

Weirsdo, I agree with Acton Bell.

Actonbell, thanks.

AP3 said...

Those are all great!

Doug said...

Thanks, Aral.

Tan Lucy Pez said...

I'm a firm adherent to the idea of having parties, especially on weekends. In fact, I believe that blind, prejudiced, and unreasoning allegiance to galas and bashes is a good thing. No?

Minka said...

First time I hear that word in Emglish. In the former East Germany we used the word "Partisan" with slight admiration.

Doug said...

Tan Lucy, that's hysterical.

Monika, no-one here uses it with admiration. It refers to anyone stupid enough to believe and repeat the foolishness that their party tells them. Anyone stupid enough to believe and repeat the foolishness that your party tells thems them is "fiercely independent" or, as noted earlier, a free-thinker.

karma said...

a French participant at an office celebration minus the silly hat

Alice: In Wonderland or Not said...

partisan: n., modern day counterpart/US version to the courtesans of old; a women that sells self for sexual pleasure of men in high political office in the United States of America; always present at political/social events in the DC and Texas.

Example: Ann Coulter

Doug said...

Karma, Mais oui, jeune fille!

Alice, nice. Partisan and courtesan don't just sound alike and they're all bimbos. You nailed it. And Ann Coulter's a himbo, in my opinion.

Jamie Dawn said...

Hardcore partisan politicians begin to look like dinosaurs and fossils.
Examples: Orin Hatch, Nancy Pelosi, Newt Gingrich, Robert Byrd, etc.................

Sar said...

Nice one, Alice! Methinks you're ready to lead a special guest Wednesday here.

(btw Doug - I didn't know you spoke French; cool!).

Doug said...

Exactly, Jamie Dawn, get the words from dinosaurs and let them harden.

"But Jesus said to him, "Follow me, and let the dead bury their own dead." Matthew 8:22. NRSV. You listening, bar of soap?

Doug said...

Yeah, Sar. I think I know four more words, too. Excuse me, mots

I agree with you. Alice? Would you feel any more like it if I said your turn probably won't come up until late August?

Sunil Natraj said...

Me.

P.S: How have you been?

KJ said...

father saying to son
Parti San
:)

Doug said...

Sunil, it hasn't been the same without you. Computer back up?

kj, is this your first time here? Welcome.

Minka said...

Doug...I know! But East Germany was under communism. The Stasi had their ears everywhere. So everybody that was a partisian was well accepted, the free-thinkers...not so much.

Doug said...

Monika, I can't imagine what that was like. The first time I was in Germany, it was still divided (I was fifteen which would have made you five) and I remember going to the Hessian Border and seeing the fence patrolled by highly armed Americans on my side and highly armed Russians on the other. The second time was this past February and I was thrilled to see what I had missed the last time. I went to all the cities I knew from Bach- Brandenburg, Berlin and Leipzig and some of the ones from Luther- Wittenburg and Magdeburg. The difference still seems oppressive. Except in Berlin where the nicest parts are old Ost-Berlin.

karma said...

vous etes tres drole

Doug said...

Mais, non, ma cherie. Je suis un fou. Ton fou, s'il vous plait. Et je ne parle pas francais.

Minka said...

I lived in Magdeburg for 5 years. When you drive through Berlin with a train you can still pretty much make out where the borders had been. In Berlin there is a street called Sonnenallee that was actually devided. I have a piece of brick from the wall that crumbled and along with it all hope of a simple, unimaginative, obedient life.
I was twelve at the time when Germany re-united and I was shocked beyond imagination when I crossed the border, got some money from the state and couldn´t buy anything because there was so much choice. Even soap had 30 varieties. Everybody had the same brand of huge, yellowish, cleanish smelling soap in the bathroom when I was liitle. The element of surprise was truly eliminated. Anyways, I seem to have gotten side-tracked.

Doug said...

Monika, it's a very interesting side-track. As a tourist it still feels like two different countries. I would have said Germans are the friendliest, most welcoming people I've encountered until I got to what was East Germany. One difference I remember is that my broken German was always greeted cheerfully in the West by patient people who seemed delighted I was trying. In Brandenburg and Leipzig especially, I may as well have been in France. Smiles came off people's faces as soon as I started talking. It must have been wierd to experience unification from your side. Like you'd moved without leaving home. Telic clause at the end?

Minka said...

Monika left her country in 1989, only to realize that she would always come back in some way.
There is your Telic Clause!

Doug said...

Doug reread his sentence which led him to wonder why he thought there was a telic clause in it. Delighted to have an in-house linguistics consultant for my blog, I had to exclaim that future posts will be more convoluted than ever!

A Little Bar of Soap said...

I'm listening, Doug, but I don't know why. This blog is FILTH!

Doug said...

I suppose you're right, Little Bar. Sigh.